Conferences and talks in 2017

 

bowdoin-chapel-winter

I spoke at Bowdoin College on 23 February 2017, in the great state of Maine. My talk was about the lantern microscope and the role of science in Victorian mass culture (and v.v.). I enjoyed a lively discussion and dinner; it may be cold outside but the Bowdoin community is warm!

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chsi-museum-web_

I spoke on “Training the ear: Reading the heart through the senses, imagination, and technology” at Harvard’s History of Medicine Working Group on 27 March 2017. Luckily the talk was scheduled near Harvard’s superb Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments — great opportunity to revisit that collection! Fun and productive discussion, too.

For series schedule click here.

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navsa-florence

From 17-20 May 2017 I was attending NAVSA/AVSA Florence and speaking as part of a panel on Building Medical Knowledges with Lorenzo Servitje and Louise Penner. My talk was on “The Educated Ear: Metaphor and System in Mediate Auscultation.”

Click here for conference website.

After that, it’s all microscope, all the time, as I start my NEH year!

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Slides prepared by Alfred Allen, founder of the Postal Microscopical Society. Image from http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/indexmag.html?http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artoct99/ellslide.html

It doesn’t take many excuses to visit the great city of Toronto, but the History of Science Society (HSS) is one of the best reasons to do so. My talk at HSS this year was called “Circulating Microscopy: The Quekett Microscopical Club, the Postal Microscopic Society, and Microscopic Periodical Culture.” I’m having a wonderful time looking at the interplay of amateurism, professionalism, and the circulation of knowledge especially through the periodical and postal systems. Ask me about group photography in this setting….

Click here for conference website.

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wood common objects cover

What do you know about Canada Balsam, the turpentine often used by microscopists in slide-making? Or, for that matter, about the Rev. J. G. Wood, and his popular Common Objects of the Microscope (1861)? My talk, “Looking at things with difficulty: Canada Balsam and the Common Objects of the Microscope” at NAVSA Banff examines the source, culture, and circulation of this crucial material, which makes  microscopy possible. 16-18 November 2017, Banff, Alberta, Canada.

Click here for conference website.

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